One of my favorite and most popular posts is “Interior Designer Remodels Double Wide.” It is about Charmaine Manley, a talented interior designer in Oregon, that completely remodeled her own 1980 double wide.
 
The greatest thing about this home, other than it being gorgeous, is that Charmaine writes that through out the remodel not one dumpster was used. Every thing was salvaged or recycled! This was not a small weekend remodel, either.

I ran across Charmaine’s Pinterest boards and had a great time looking over her pins. She has fabulous taste in my opinion. Her use of color really inspires me. Following one of her pins I linked around to her blog again and spent half an hour just day dreaming.
I found so many great photos that I hadn’t included in the first post! The first post was just a few small photos (I was new to blogging and didn’t know how to do anything.) So I figured I’d share the good photos I found. These are all found on  High Desert Diva and are all her property. 
The back of her home and the front entrance. Notice the curved pergola that goes perfectly with the curved deck. The rich earthy colors she uses makes for a very welcoming home.
 
Here’s her office. The yummy yellow is well….yummy!

She brought the kitchen out a couple of feet and made a wall into a half wall. This open up the living room, dining room and kitchen.

The dining room. She removed the built in and replaced it with a gorgeous piece of furniture.
The kitchen was remodeled into a modern space with all environmentally friendly products.

This cozy living room would make any relaxed.

This bedroom would be a perfect place to wake up every morning.
The master bath is so cozy and colorful.
The guest bathroom is fit for a king.

This home has so many great elements in it. Charmaine used her move to continue her small footprint living and she used only the most environmentally friendly products she could. This home is both inspiration by design and by a high standard of green living, as well.  

This photo was taken right outside her home and tells a wonderful story in itself. What a wonderful home and surroundings to be in!

 As always, thank you so much for reading Mobile Home Living!

11 Responses

  1. CrystalMHL

    I love this one too! I had found this one when I first started MHL but
    didn't find very good photos…so glad I stumbled on her Pinterest
    boards!

    Reply
  2. CrystalMHL

    It is awesome! I am so glad I found the larger photos..on the first
    post all I could find was little tiny one ;-D

    Reply
  3. CrystalMHL

    It is beautiful! She does have a talent that's for sure..hope your
    doing well Irish!

    Reply
  4. Diana

    Very beautiful! A lot of her before pictures look similar to our MH (though we've painted and refloored and gotten rid of some of the tackiness factor)…but as far as the room arrangements. I wish I could see a floor plan of some of these homes where they've taken out or moved walls. I have such a hard time with spacial visualization, it would be helpful for me to understand exactly what they did. Thanks so much for your site!

    Reply
  5. CrystalMHL

    Hi Diana!

    Isn't it amazing how just doing a couple of things to a mh will get
    rid of the tackiness? New flooring and trim is the best way but both
    are a bit costly…thank you so much for your kind words! I will try
    to find some floor plans of remodels cause I'm the same way, I like to
    see how they changed things to best suit their needs. Just moving a
    wall or 2 can really make a huge difference. Thank you!

    Reply
  6. CrystalMHL

    Hi Shirlee,

    It is amazing that no dumpster was used. Maybe the trash that was not
    recyclable was taken by truck so they didn't have to use a dumpster
    per se, just a truck. It is on her blog where she writes she didn't
    use a dumpster and most everything was recycled. I thought that was an
    amazing feat. I hope all is well with you and yours!

    Reply
  7. CrystalMHL

    Absolutely Beth! Manufactured homes are the bees knees and many, many families are happily living in one..lol. Thank you for commenting and reading!

    Reply
  8. Andrew & Elizabeth

    My wife and I love what you did with the renovations on the Double Wide modular home. The porch and the interior wall work was awesome as are the French doors and the bathrooms. I recently inherited my late fathers FL vacation home which will be our primary residence and appears to be exactly the same size as this one, ours already has a screened in FL room on the rear and a new roof was recently put on. Could you possibly give us an idea what all these renovations cost? We would be interested in almost the same changes except of course decorations and we’d like to use our existing furniture and possessions. The Front porch is almost exactly what we envisioned we would like one that is not the full length of the home but a large center porch perhaps a bit wider than the one in your photo with screens, porch swing and two rockers plus some potted plants etc. We’d also have to replace all our single pane windows with double pane energy efficient replacements and a rear staircase that isn’t as steep as what we now have. Any help you can give us would be greatly appreciated. Thank You. Andrew & Elizabeth

    Reply
    • Crystal Adkins

      Hi Andrew and Elizabeth! Thank you so much for reading MMHL and for commenting! I greatly appreciate it and hope to hear from you lots more. Perhaps you can keep us updated on your remodel and then share it here on the site when you’re all finished?

      Anyway, this beautiful remodel was done by Charmaine Manley, a talented interior designer in Oregon and this is her own home! I find that amazing that a talented interior designer saw the potential the home had and then made it real. Unfortunately, I’ve never been able to contact Mrs. Manley so unless she just happens to see this post and your questions, I doubt you’ll be able to get the answers you are looking for. However, I’ll try to guide you in the right direction. I’ve helped completely remodeled 3 older mobile homes and have always helped in updating and modifing my own manufactured homes. We’re in the process of remodeling a ’78 single wide right now and trust me we are doing it on a very low (non-existent) budget.

      Here’s what I’ve learned:

      -If you can do the demolition yourselves, you will save quite a bit of money, especially if you are gutting a home and moving studs or installing sheet rock. The trash bin is very expensive to rent so if you can haul it off one truck load at a time you will save even more. Try to salvage as much as possible and have Goodwill or a re-salvage place pick it up (tubs, doors, etc).

      -You can sheet rock yourselves with a little research and practice. Start somewhere that isn’t seen (behind the washer and dryer) and learn the feel of it and rent a vacuum device for the sanding part (it’s more upfront but the convience pays for itself)

      -If you are having major work done never go with the lowest bid (but this is just my opinion based on my own experience.) Low-balling an estimate and then adding extra charges is a well known trick. You’ll want to call past customers/clients and check the states database to make extra sure they are insured and licensed and haven’t had any complaints. Have everything in writing and ask them what you can do yourself to save money.

      - Don’t buy cheap paint. You’ll end up using more trying to get the coverage you need. Paint and good brushes are essential to a good paint job.

      - Sometimes it pays to go to those fancy kitchen and bath centers instead of the big box home improvement stores to buy cabinetry. The specialty stores may have last years floor display on sale at a great price and may even be able to install it at a good price too (they want rid of it at a little profit if possible so they may throw in a days installation)

      -There’s a difference between doing a remodel on the cheap and cheaply. You will always get what you pay for and sometimes it’s best to pay a bit more upfront to get a better quality, longer lasting product than having to replace it. Flooring is a perfect example of this.

      -You are in FL and there’s a couple of great window manufacturers there (I remember passing them around Sarasota) so you maybe able to call the factories and see if they sell any of the cast offs from the production line. A little ding in the framing and they can’t sell it to their customers but they may be able to sell it to you. I meant to do that when we lived in Sarasota.

      -The porch you want is a bit expensive to be honest but only because of the framing and lumber. If it were me and I didn’t want to have to do it myself, I would hire someone to install the footers, frame and roof and then add the decking boards myself. That can save a good bit of labor costs.

      -Use Craigslist, trading papers and classifieds to find the building material, cabinetry, windows, doors, etc. You’ll be amazed at the stuff out there and most of it is just stuff people had left over after their own remodels or no return policies on special orders and the item didn’t fit.

      -Call your local trade school or community college that has construction classes and see if you can’t work something out with them for a day or 10. Hands on experience is always needed for the students and there is always a licensed person there helping so you could very well get the sheet rock hung, windows hung and even a deck built at a decent price. The town I grew up in had a trade school and every year the classes built one double wide like home and then sold it at the end of the year and that’s great for learning that aspect of construction but they can’t do that with repair and remodels.

      I hope that helps you a bit. I can’t put a price on how much it all costs but definitely go over to her blog and read all about it, it may give you a better idea of all that was involved. Here’s the links: http://etsyhighdesertdiva.blogspot.com/2010/07/life-and-design.html

      Thanks so much, Crystal

      Reply

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